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CET Accredited Training

Download your Orbita Black/Visualise CET Accredited Training Catalogue here CET Training Catalogue

Seeing Beyond the Eyes

Bringing Sight Loss into Focus

This course is specifically designed for optical and eye care professionals. Consultant Ophthalmologists, Optometrists (Optom’s), Dispensing Opticians (DO’s), Optical Assistants (OA’s) and Optical Nurses. This CET is facilitated by Visualise Training and Consultancy in association with Orbita Black Limited a General Optical Council (GOC) accredited Continuing Education Training (CET) Provider.

a man standing looking at eye chart in an eye clinic talking the to a male otometrist says there must be something you do and the optometrist replies i'm sorry

This training course comprises of multiple 1 hour interactive/discussion workshop modules of which registrants will accrue 3 CET points for each hour attended.  This can be delivered individually or combined.

This course is designed to enable, empower and engage optical professionals giving the knowledge to effectively support patients with low vision and to ‘see beyond the eyes’.

The sessions are very interactive with discussion groups, feedback to the lead facilitator from each group, and opportunities for questions throughout. The learning objectives will be reviewed at the beginning and end of the course. A feedback questionnaire will be distributed, and registrants provided with a reflective learning statement which is to be completed and retained to enable reflection when accepting CET points.

Hour 1

Title: – An Introduction to Visual Impairment Discussion Workshop

CET Number C-58847

Description

An introduction to visual impairment discusses the principle causes of sight loss in children, adults and the elderly and the associated functional symptoms in the initial and advanced stages. It discusses the accessibility challenges people with a visual impairment experience when visiting eye care practices and considers what reasonable adjustments should be made to better serve such patients.  It will educate opticians as to what support and services are available for patients with low vision and where to refer them too.  A unique perspective is provided by a presenter who is a qualified Sight Loss Rehabilitation Assistant, Eye Clinic Liaison Officer (ECLO) and himself visually impaired.

Competencies Met

Optometrist:

  • Ocular Disease Standards of Practice
  • Communication

Dispensing Optician:

  • Ocular Abnormalities
  • Low Vision
  • Standards of Practice
  • Communication

Learning Objectives

8.1.2 Dispensing Opticians will understand the functional symptoms associated with the principle causes of serious sight loss including glaucoma, AMD, diabetic retinopathy, retinitis Pigmentosa, retinal detachment, hemianopia etc

6.1.2 Optometrists will understand the functional symptoms associated with the principle causes of serious sight loss including glaucoma, AMD, diabetic retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa, retinal detachment, hemianopia etc

6.1.1 Dispensing Opticians will understand the causes of low vision, their effects on vision, and the effect this has on patients’ ability to carry out every day practical tasks e.g. cooking, mobility and daily living

2.13.8 Dispensing Opticians and Optometrists will better understand the needs of patients with visual impairment and what constitutes reasonable adjustment and how to make their practices more accessible

1.1.3 Dispensing Opticians and Optometrists will understand how best to communicate effectively with patients with a visual impairment


Hour 2

Title:- Saving sight, supporting sight loss – discussion workshop

CET Number C-59110

 

Description

This workshop discusses 4 low vision scenarios / cases of preventable sight loss:

  • A registered sight impaired Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) patient with low vision needs, and her concerned sisters who want advice for themselves
  • A veteran glaucoma patient who has difficulty administering eye drops, and relating poor compliance to preventable sight loss
  • A patient presenting with classic symptoms of retinal detachment and why this is the number one cause of clinical fitness to practice cases and insurance claims.
  • A congenital aphakic patient, as an infant and as a young adult, and how failure to dispense properly can itself cause a patient to unnecessarily have low vision

Competencies Met:

Optometrist:

  • Ocular Disease
  • Optical Appliances
  • Standards of Practice
  • Communication

Dispensing Optician:

  • Ocular Abnormalities
  • Low Vision
  • Standards of Practice
  • Pediatric Dispensing
  • Communication
  • Optical Appliances

Learning Objectives

8.1.3 To further raise understanding of dispensing opticians of poor compliance with treatment for glaucoma, how to instil eye drops and how to improve compliance in elderly or frail patients

6.1.11 To further understanding of optometrists of poor compliance with treatment for glaucoma, how to instil eye drops and how to improve compliance in elderly or frail patients

6.3.2 Dispensing opticians to understand the implications of Age Related Macular Degeneration and the type of low vision aids that will benefit such patients including non-optical solutions.

4.2.1 Optometrists to understand the implications of Age Related Macular Degeneration and the type of low vision aids that will benefit such patients including non-optical solutions.

8.1.6 To understand the importance of all optical staff being trained in safely dealing with patients who attend or phone with a potential ocular emergency, questions to ask and appropriate actions to take. What are the responsibilities of a DO on the shop floor versus an optom who is fully booked.

2.12.4 To understand the importance of all optical staff being trained in safely dealing with patients who attend or phone with a potential ocular emergency, questions to ask and appropriate actions to take. What are the responsibilities of a DO on the shop floor versus an optom who is fully booked including new CoO guidance that a full eye examination does not have to be conducted.

2.12.4 Dispensing opticians to understand their duty to refer, how to go about it without “impersonating an optometrist” and the legality of conducting pre-screening tests in the absence of an optometrist

9.2.1 Dispensing opticians understand the difficulties in refracting very young children, why vertex distance measurements are not always practical and how that might affect the final prescription in an Aphakic patient.

1.2.4 Dispensing opticians will be able to communicate appropriately with AMD patients, and their relatives at risk of AMD, about self-monitoring of progress (Amsler Grid, Face Test), and lifestyle choice that may prevent or slow progress of the disease (give up smoking, 5 a day, fish, nutritional supplements, AREDS 2)

1.2.4 Optometrists will be able to communicate appropriately with AMD patients, and their relatives at risk of AMD, about self-monitoring of progress (Amsler Grid, Face Test), and lifestyle choice that may prevent or slow progress of the disease (give up smoking, 5 a day, fish, nutritional supplements, AREDS 2)

4.1.4 Dispensing Opticians to relate the accuracy of measurements in very high-power dispensing and how failure to fit as close as possible, and to compensate an Rx when required can lead patients to have low vision unnecessarily due to restricted field of view or poor visual acuity.

4.1.3 Optometrists to relate the accuracy of measurements in very high-power dispensing and how failure to fit as close as possible, and to compensate an Rx when required can lead patients to have low vision unnecessarily due to restricted field of view or poor visual acuity.


Hour 3

Title:- Supporting Patients with Sight Loss

CET Number C-56610

Description

Supporting Patients with Sight Loss discusses the implications of the Equality Act 2010 on practices and practitioners, and explores the difficulties experienced by patients with low vision in practices and the built environment more generally and further explores what reasonable adjustments should be made to better serve such patients.

Competencies Met:

 Optometrists:

  • Standards of Practice
  • Communication

 Dispensing Optician:

  • Standards of Practice
  • Communication

Learning Objectives

 


Hour 4

Title: Communicating with patients who have low vision

CET Number: C-56611

Description

Communicating with patients who have low vision will include:

  • How to communicate effectively and guide patients with a visual impairment
  • Patients choice – cane or guide dog
  • The use of assistive technology and how it can enable independent living.

Competencies Met:

 Optometrists:

  • Standards of Practice
  • Communication

 Dispensing Optician:

  • Standards of Practice
  • Communication

Learning Objectives

2.13.8 Dispensing Opticians will better understand the needs of patients with a visual impairment and how to approach, communicate and guide

2.13.8 Optometrists will better understand the needs of patients with visual impairment and how to approach, communicate and guide

1.1.3 Dispensing Opticians will learn how to interact with blind and partially sighted patients and their guide dogs, understand the different types of canes, and various means of guiding patients who require assistance, as well as the most appropriate language to use.

1.1.3 Optometrists will learn how to interact with blind and partially sighted patients and their guide dogs, understand the different types of canes, and various means of guiding patients who require assistance, as well as the most appropriate language to use.

 


Hour 5

Title: An Introduction to Disability Awareness

Code: C-58848

Discussion Workshop: 3 Interactive CET Points

Description:

An introduction to disability awareness discusses the prevalence and main causes of disability in children, adults and the elderly and the associated symptoms and problems patients experience. It discusses the problems disabled people, including the visually impaired experience when visiting eye care practitioners and considers what reasonable adjustments should be made to better serve such patients.

 

Competencies Met:

 Optometrists:

  • Standards of Practice
  • Communication

 Dispensing Optician:

  • Standards of Practice
  • Communication

Learning Objectives

2.13.8 Dispensing opticians and optometrists will better understand the needs of patients with a range of disabilities including visual impairment and what constitutes reasonable adjustment

1.1.3 Optometrists and dispensing opticians will understand how best to communicate (including through the use of technology) with a patients living with a variety of disabilities including visual impairment, learning difficulties and conditions requiring the use of a wheelchair.

 

 


Course Leader:

This course is delivered by Daniel Williams who has a wealth of professional and personal knowledge, not only living with a visual impairment accessing eye care pathways himself but in his professional capacity as a sight loss Rehabilitation Assistant, qualified Eye Clinic Liaison Officer (ECLO), actively working with individuals with sight loss to aid their independence and empower them and their families. Daniel is also a Work-Place Needs Assessor ensuring people who acquires sight loss retain employment and also is involved in a number of panels, including, but not limited to the RNIB Working Age and Transitions Panel which involves having a voice in shaping the direction of sight loss services.  Daniel is an active advocate for influencing positive change within the UK, to ensure all services are accessible for all. Daniel has also worked as a consultant for the Royal National Institute of the Blind (RNIB), delivering workplace adjustments and awareness training.Man at optician hand on face with woman saying theres nothing more I can do

Provider – Orbita Black Limited

This CET is facilitated / presented by Visualise Training and Consultancy in association with Orbita Black Limited a GOC accredited CET Provider. Please help us to improve our training by providing feedback using the forms provided and via the CET Optics website when accepting points. CET Points are uploaded within 10 working days – after that period please get in touch with your name and number as they appear on the GOC register. Queries with regards to points or any complaints should be directed to orbitablack@gmail.com.

Please note that most delays in attendance submission are caused by delegates providing incorrect GOC numbers, practicing name (for example if you have recently married), or simply through illegible handwriting. It is a requirement of the CET that all delegates participate in the activities and / or discussions and are present for the full duration of each session for which points are to be awarded. Please be aware that any public CET session may be audited anonymously by the GOC to ensure published learning objectives are achieved and that providers and registrants comply with the scheme requirements.

 

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Download your Orbita Black/Visualise CET Accredited Training Catalogue here CET Training Catalogue

What do others say about this service?

Dan Williams recently presented a fascinating talk on ‘An introduction to visual impairment’ at our Dudley & Sandwell CET day.  The talk was a passionate and insightful representation of the various difficulties encountered by an individual with visual impairment (VI).  I found the talk and video very practical and useful and I felt I gained a much deeper knowledge of how frustrating VI is for the individual concerned and realised how little society, even Optometry, does to make adequate provision for their sensory needs” – Course Attendee

“I think Visual Impairment Awareness Training should be compulsory for opticians – in 31 years this is the first time I have done it and despite helping Daniel with them, and feeling I am quite well up on low vision issues compared to most DOs there is not really any substitute for learning from someone who lives with VI every day. It was a moving and humbling experience and could make such difference to the lives of disabled people if opticians were experienced ambassadors for doing the right thing.” – Course Attendee

“This has been a thoroughly enjoyable and inspiring piece of interactive training. Daniel has given me complete understanding of issues visually impaired people come across on a daily basis, the session was informative, yet fun and light hearted. I would recommend this training to anyone in the Optical environment. Thank You” – Kelly Wannacott, Dispensing Optician

Cardiff Community Housing Association

This session made you aware of the sophisticated communications skills needed to provide appropriate support to ensure the person with impairment had an inclusive experience (in performing a task for example). I recommend this course to anyone in the optical profession and who support VI people in other fields such as education. Experience of how to guide a VI Px should be a requirement for all eye care practitioners and their staff – it was excellent – I’d definitely recommend it. It was also a really fun session the three sessions were over before we knew it. – Course Attendee

“The aspect I enjoyed most about Dan’s talk was that he didn’t try and evoke pity or demonstrate anger and frustration, he simply offered and suggested practical guidance which left me keen to go out and do things better.  I am grateful for his honesty and professionalism.  He was a charming and effective speaker and I look forward to hearing him speak again in the future”  –  Roselin Birhah BSc (Hons) MSc MCOptom, LOC CET Officer